Archive for category Development

China Sahana/VM Deployment–Day 4

We had two meetings today and Giovanni, Trishan, and Antonio spent much of the day fixing various problems. An updated look at the VM Module:

vmchina2.jpg

The 9:30 AM meeting was a Skype voice conference with our IBM-NYC team contact, Gang Chen, originally from Sichuan province.  (He told us that he has been in touch with relatives in China and all of his family are safe.)   We gave him an overview of our efforts so far and discussed some of the problems we encountered. He was able to login through VPN to test the current Sahana demo on the China server. He agreed to conduct a thorough test of VM module, focusing on missing or erroneous translations and get back to us at this evening’s team meeting.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Comments

China Sahana/VM Deployment–Day 3

The Monday night conference call consisted of the same cast of players: the project leader from IBM-China and his assistant, three members of the Sahana core team, and the Trinity VM team.

One problem has been finding a suitable way to work collaboratively on a common code base–i.e., CVS control. The Sahana team has been committing bug fixes and customizations to rel_0_6 on their CVS repository. But the China team is making direct changes to the codebase and doesn’t have (easy?) access to Sahana’s CVS. For now, the solution has been the China team develops “fix lists” and transmits them to the Sahana team, which commits them to the repository–not the most efficient operation.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Comments

China Sahana/VM Deployment–Day 2

For the Sunday night conference call, the VM development team consisted of Trishan, Antonio, Giovanni, and yours truly. The other participants included the IBM-China team leader and assistant and three members of the Sahana core team in Colombo. Here’s a look at the team’s efforts so far:


VMChina
The head of the IBM-China team set up working protocols so that all communications would go between team leaders. Trishan was designated the team leader for the VM development team.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Comments

China Sahana/VM Deployment–Day 1

Starting last Saturday, May 17th, a Trinity Sahana team consisting of Trishan de Lanerolle, Antonio Alcorn, Ernel Wint, and Vinit Agrawal got called into action to help prepare the VM module for deployment in China.

We should have blogged this on Saturday, as it was happening, but here’s a recap of the story. The team was in D.C. for the IBM/Sahana traning and planning to visit the Air and Space Museum before heading back to Hartford when they got a call from Chamindra da Silva asking them to come over to his hotel to help internationalize the VM module. That was 8:30 AM. Antonio and Ravith worked together on modifying the VM template engine (Whiz) to get it to process text through Sahana’s localization functions. That took until 3:30 PM.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Comments

Sahana/IBM Training

This past week an H-FOSS team attended a week-long, IBM-supported Sahana training session at IBM offices in Washington D.C. The team consisted of H-FOSS Project Director, Trishan de Lanerolle and summer interns Antonio Alcorn (UConn ‘10), Ernel Wint (Conn College ‘09) and Vinit Agrawal (Trinity ‘10). I attended the Thursday and Friday sessions. Antonio and Ernel worked on our Volunteer Management (VM) module last summer.

The workshop was organized by Diane Melley and Rebecca Curzon of the IBM Corporate Citizenship and Corporate Affairs office and conducted by Chamindra da Silva and Ravith from Sahana. IBM brought in 10-12 members of its crisis management team from Milwaukee, San Francisco, San Diego, and other locations in the U.S. as well as a developer from the IBM office in Poughkeepsie.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

No Comments

Open Social and Non Profits

Others (besides me) have seen a connection between Open Social and its potential impact in the non-profit world. On Beth Kanter’s blog, How Non-Profits Can Use Social Media, I found her post on Explaining Open Social to Your Executive Director. It’s mostly a rehash of what others have said about open social.

The most informative take on this comes from a October 2007 post by Allan Benamer on his Non-Profit Tech Blog. He points out that the typical nonprofit will not be able to take advantage of Open Social because it lacks the development resources and expertise. This might provide a terrific opportunity for our project, with computing students providing the missing expertise. Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

1 Comment

Microsoft gets bright spark to give away their development tools to students

According to a AP release “Microsoft giving away developer software” Microsoft is letting students download their development studio and server applications for free. Is it a strategic move attempting to position themselves against the trend of web developers going with the free open source LAMP stack or an additional choice for web developers, as Bill Gates explains in the article.

“Gates said students will want to try Microsoft’s tools because they’re more powerful than the open-source combination of Linux-based operating systems, the Apache Web server, the MySQL database and the PHP scripting language used to make complex Web sites.”

Will this have an impact on the open source movement? Would this simply expand the options available for development. Once the application is developed could it be distributed under an open source license, or would the embedded Microsoft technologies pose a stumbling block. According to a Computer world.com article: Analysis: Popularity of open-source, Adobe tools on campus prods Microsoft’s giveaway to students. the free software is intended for educational purposes, and not for commercial software development or software-for-hire basis. The article goes on to quote Joe Wilson, Microsoft’s senior director of academic initiatives for developer and platform evangelism.” But Microsoft has no plans to enforce those terms, Wilson said.” Would this pose a threat to open source development platforms such as JavaBean from Sun or IBM supported Eclipse. Time will tell.

, , ,

1 Comment