Posts Tagged nptech

HFOSS Summer Institute Gets Going

The 2008 Summer HFOSS Institute got started on Tuesday. We have 13 talented students from 5 different colleges (Trinity, Connecticut College, Wesleyan University, University of Connecticut and University of Hartford). We spent Tuesday and Wednesday getting to know each other a bit and introducing students to the five development projects we will tackle this summer: Read the rest of this entry »

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Bowdoin Project Spreads to Savannah

Allen Tucker reports that he just got back from Savannah , Georgia, where he helped install the RMH Homebase system at the Ronald McDonald House there. Here’s a link to the Savannah site.

RMH Homebase is the calendar and scheduling system that Allen and four of his Bowdoin students built as a course project for the Ronald McDonald House in Portland, Maine. This is exactly how we had hoped the HFOSS project would grow and spread. It would be really great to find a team of CS students at a school in Savannah who can help maintain it or otherwise get involved in HFOSS.

Way to go Allen!

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Open Health Tools

As reported here, an international consortium of government agencies, corporations, universities has formed an open-source development effort called Open Health Tools. Its main goal is to tackle the interoperability problems between health care products and services.

The project has some excellent high-powered sponsors, including IBM, the Eclipse foundation, Oracle, and Red Hat. Among the participating Universities are Sweden’s Linkoping University (Biomedical Engineering) and Oregon State’s Open Source Lab.

Its first project will be based on an Extensible Markup Language processing engine that is used by the UK’s National Health Service. The project is also supported by the U.S Veterans Health Administration.

Interoperability problems are major contributors to the high cost of health care in the U.S. Let’s hope this project can gain some traction. Their goal is to add eight new organizations per month.

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Linux.com Feature

The humanitarian FOSS Project is a subject of a brief article on Linux.com called “Humanitarian projects and open source: Working together to revitalize computer sciences” article by author Tina Gasperson on March 26.

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Open Social and Non Profits

Others (besides me) have seen a connection between Open Social and its potential impact in the non-profit world. On Beth Kanter’s blog, How Non-Profits Can Use Social Media, I found her post on Explaining Open Social to Your Executive Director. It’s mostly a rehash of what others have said about open social.

The most informative take on this comes from a October 2007 post by Allan Benamer on his Non-Profit Tech Blog. He points out that the typical nonprofit will not be able to take advantage of Open Social because it lacks the development resources and expertise. This might provide a terrific opportunity for our project, with computing students providing the missing expertise. Read the rest of this entry »

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